Adjustable Hitch Pins

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Controlled Down Bearing - The strings of the piano go up from the termination point nearest the keys, over the bridge, and down to the hitch pin in the cast iron plate. When tension is applied to the string to obtain the desired pitch, the taut string pushes down on the bridge that is supported by the crown or upward curvature of the soundboard. This downward force is called downbearing. It is dependent on the size of the angle as the string travels up to the bridge and back down to the hitch pin. The adjustable hitch pin allows precise control to attain the design specification for downbearing. The life of the soundboard, tuning stability, tone, sound projection, and sustain are all maximized with properly designed and controlled downbearing.

Adjustable Hitch Pins - Down bearing is made up of two parts: Front bearing (the angle on the key or front side of the bridge) and back bearing (the angle on the hitch pin or back side of the bridge). Adjustable hitch pins allow craftsmen to precisely set the front bearing to the required specification without regard to back bearing. The back bearing can then be independently set to its own required specification by positioning the adjustable hitch pin. Front bearing and back bearing are thereby precisely controlled, individually, to attain the overall down bearing specification. Pianos without adjustable hitch pins can only hope for an overall aproximation.

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